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02-Dec-2017 07:42

The Susa Valley, situated between Maurienne, France and Turin, Italy, has been urbanised by the economic development of the region.

The area is scarred by infrastructure like the Frejus highway, an international railway, and numerous dams, tunnels and industries.

The use of the concept implies the necessity of such projects’ regardless of citizens’ opposition to their implementation in their own territory, or “backyard”.

This case study looks at the TAV conflict through the lenses of ecological economics and political ecology, drawing on both scientific sources and “activist knowledge”.

The international section, with Lyon Turin Ferroviaire (LTF), an Italo-French company in charge, would connect St Jean de Maurienne, France, with San Didero, Italy (Figure 3) through two main tunnels of 52 and 12 km in length (Figure 4).

The Italian section, under the control of the Italian railway network company Rete Ferroviaria Italiana (RFI) will be 43 km long passing through the Garvio – Musinè tunnels, respectively 12 and 21km long, with service access points at Condove, Caprie and Almese.

The roles of various actors and their arguments are then examined to better understand the context and dynamics of the conflict, and to identify the influence of values regarding health, environment and ecology, safety, speed, cost, territory, transport, economy and quality of The high-speed line is divided into 3 segments (Figure 2): The French one managed by Réseau Ferré de France (RFF) would go from Lyon to St Jean de Maurienne.

This “development” has had significant environmental and social impacts.

The high speed train line (Treno Alta Velocita in Italian, or TAV) between Turin and Lyon is planned at the intersection of 2 main European axes to complement the European railway network by increasing the transport of passengers as well as goods.

The TAV will then reach Turin via trenches and viaducts (Allasio, 2006).

Figure 2: the 3 sections of the main project for TAV Turin-Lyon, (Appiotti, Marcincioni, 2009)Figure 3: TAV line from Venaus to Turin, the Italian part in red; the international part in blue, the existing line in black, and the Susa valley municipalities (Leonardi, 2007).Figure 4: The two main tunnels of the project: in red the base tunnel and the Bussoleno tunnel ( The TAV project proposals have evolved and expanded for almost two decades.